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as spirits, no breakthrough was achieved. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are in fact helping to sustain president assad. >> talks also focused on iraq's transition to democracy as it prepares for upcoming elections at a time when violence is on the rise. >>> back here in the u.s., we're watching a lot of weather. bill karins here with a look at the northeast. you say you're promising this will be the last time. >> it has to be, right? >> i hope you're right. >> ten inches of snow in denver, nine in condition can city. st. louis had 12 inches. this isn't your average snowstorm. st. louis is not a very snowy city. they got a foot of snow. it was the most snow they've had in one single storm going back since 1982. and here it was, the end of march. st. louis should typically be about 60 degrees. i think you get the gist. the storm is moving through the ohio valley, now hitting maryland, d.c. and maryland. we've picked up as much as three to four inches in some areas of maryland. that's pushing
. >>> we have breaking news tonight. ten years after we found chemical weapons in iraq, ba bassar al assad could possibly using the chemical weapons that we know he has right now. >> you're going to hear from one very brave and lucky young man tonight. >> plus congresswoman michelle bamman, she claims that president obama is wasting her money on his lavish lifestyle. where is she getting her facts? we tracked her down and asked her to see how she responded. basically, she wouldn't stop walking or running, almost. keeping them honest. we begin now with breaking news. news that just triggered military action by the united states in syria. the news tonight that the possibility that the regime in syria might be doing the one thing that could trigger american military action. might be using chemical weapons. crossing a redline that president obama himself lay down. now, they have used chemical weapons, that would leave the president with a major challenge as he heads tonight to israel. now, the suggestion that chemical weapons might have been used came a few hours ago today from mike rogers, sa
is worried what will happen in the country of the deadly assad regime is out. president obama's comments came of the president assad pledged to wipe out forces of darkness from his country, following the reports of a suicide has' last night at a damascus mosque, including a cleric who supported the syrian regime. this is the first time in thesive war that a suicide bomber has struck inside a house of worship, and the sunni cleric who was injured -- or killed, reportedly the most senior religious figure killed in the entirety of the conflict. president assad vowed revenge. we will destroy their extremism until we have cleansed the country. little doubt the syrian leader is referring to the rebel fighters. the opposition denying anything to do with the attack. ed henry is with the president. >>> ed, president obama is under a lot of pressure to take some military action in syria. >> that's right, including from some fellow democrats, who like carl levin, if not boots on the ground, at least a no-fly zone. senator levin and joining senator john mccain there could be surgical astrikes. the presid
's thinking on what to do about syria, how the united states can help move to the post-assad period. >> let me ask you quickly about this speech, because it's coming up in about 40 minutes. obviously, the relationship, if you look at the polls between the president and the israeli people, has been strained as well. here's what a university professor wrote in "the daily beast" this morning. mr. obama will be talking to young people who are neither listless cynics nor disaffected sofa-plit koes. many of them have marched in demonstrations and took active part in protest rallies. our record of effective activism is by comparison to every other recent social movement, stellar. is this an important speech for him there? if so, what should his message be? >> well, it is an important speech. he has about a 10% approval rating in israel. that will undoubtedly tick up. but this is part of the president's style. you remember in 2009 he spoke at cairo university. he's made a choice here. he's not going to speak government to government. he's going to move beyond that dialogue to talk directly to the isra
it was the assad regime used some type of chemical weapons on rebels in northern syria, around the aleppo region. of course the assad regime and assad state television said rebels used those weapons. what we're hearing from western intelligence officials, it was opposite, assad regime used some type of chemical weapons and killed somewhere between 15 and 26 people. conflicting reports. we heard 15. we also heard 26. there is a lot of differing information right now. but we have confirmed of course, there have been some type of chemical weapons being used in syria. now who used them on exactly which group is still very much unclear right now, bill. bill: conor, thank you. just one line crossing the associated press at the moment here. reuters was reporting on this a little bit earlier. we're sorting through this on our end. conor come back when you have more from jerusalem there. martha: our thanks to him. this is breaking news right now. we want to bring in ambassador john bolton to get his reaction to this. you heard what conor powell told us. what do you think, ambassador? >> i don't take anyt
bear. this video we just showed from the assad regime, shown on syrian state television. want to show it again. it's supposedly a victim suffering from a chemical weapons attack. no one shows any physical signs of injury, no con vumgss, no vomiting. three experts say that judging from what they see here, this doesn't seem like a chemical weapons attack. knowing what you know about these type of agents and their effect on humans, do you agree? >> you know, it's difficult to tell without examining the patients. and you need sophisticated equipment to do that. a lot of the symptoms you're seeing in these patients could be caused by insecticide, for instance. any organo phosphate which saron is, but the fact that so few people have died or if any have died tells me that this probably wasn't a sar ron attack but we can't rule out some sort of diluted vehicle. >> the regime is saying it's the rebels using chemicals. if it was something like a diluted chemical, dispersal agent or something, would that be crossing the red line? >> are sure. look, it may be. what we know about syria's chemical
are already the single largest donor of humanitarian assistance to the syrian people. i'm confident that assad will go. it is not a question of if. it is when. and so part of what we have to spend a lot of time thinking about is what is the aftermath? for the american people we have to recognize we have a stake here. >> a half million syrian refugees have fled to jordan. a nation already dependent on foreign aid including $13 billion from the u.s. king abdullah says assad's days are numbers but fears islam rule could emerge in its place. chuck todd is traveling with the president and asking the president as many questions as he wants. that's how chuck todd gets down. chuck, i have one question for you. what is going on in your world right now? >> well, it has been a pretty busy day. you brought up the issue of syria and this is classic all politics is local issue when it comes to jordan. this issue of syrian refugees and the economic toll it is taking on the country is clearly the number one item on the king's agenda. he equated it. he made an interesting little parallel. he said they may get
administration to use patriot missiles to degrade the assad regime's air power and the chair and ranking members of the house intelligence committee have introduced a bill calling for the administration to arm syrian rebels. asked today about whether the united states would provide a more aggressive military response to the syrian crisis, the president would only say this. >> the united states often finds itself in a situation where if it goes in militarily then it's criticized for going in militarily. and if it doesn't go in militarily then people say why aren't you doing something militarily, and, you know, my response at this stage is to make sure that what we do contributes to bringing an end to the bloodshed as quickly as possible. >> joining me now is nbc's peteral exandriny. >> the president wraps up his four-day visit to the middle east tomorrow. with renewed pressure to handle the crisis in syria, a nation he's not visiting, what is the effect of this trip been on that issue, do you think? >> reporter: well, i think we've got a pretty good sense of it as i was there in the news conferen
weapon attack in syria. the rebels are blaming president assad's forces, but the government blames the rebels. meanwhile, president obama has said use of chemical weapons would be a red line for his administration. but if these latest accusations prove true, is now the time for u.s. boots on the ground? here now to tell us is house intelligence committee chair mike rogers. he's a republican from michigan. keith and jimmy are still with us. chairman rogers, thank you very much, sir. is there truly conclusive evidence that one side or the other has really used chemical weapons. >> larry, when i look at all of the evidence, all of the intelligence, and the body of reporting over the last two years, i come to the conclusion with a high probability that the assad regime has used, at least in limited quantities, chemical weapons. they've also put them in a position to be used, and i believe, and the intelligence community, i think, believes that they have serious intent to use them under the right circumstances. so the red line that the president talked about, august 20th, was, if they m
.s. is training fighters to join the battle against president bashar assad owho has been slaughtering his own people for more than two years now. the program has been going on in jordan for at least 8 months. the trainees do not include members of free syrian army which has meanwhile the u.s. reports it's pulling half of its foreign staffers out of syria after a mortar attack damaged their hotel and a vehicle in damascus. a spokesman says that the move is temporary and united nations is still committed to finding a political solution to that bloody civil war. the united nations now we are hearing about new fox report correspondent more sign today of how tough this remains for that opposition. >> on a military and political level, first the e founder and one the leaders of the free syrian army has been badly wounded in a car bomb attack. in fact, we are hearing that that gentleman right there has lost a leg. that a major blow to the free syria army. then on the political front, the leader of the syrian national coalition has resigned. citing differences with other senior figures within the opp
been very clear to the assad regime but also to other players on the ground that a red line for us is we start seeing a whole bunch of chemical weapons moving around or being utilized. that would change my calculus. that would change my question. >> just a few minutes ago senators mccain and graham issued a statement saying if today's reports are substantiated the president's red line has been crossed and we'd urge him to take immediate action to impose the consequences he has promised. where we're in the process and what if they did use chemical weapons? >> well, jake, we take all of these reports very, very seriously. as you heard in the president's voice just now and you saw in his presentation to the white house press corps and to the world we are going to be very clear to the syrian regime as we have been throughout and to all the syrian supporters throughout the world and then obviously to our partners in the tlanlg regit if this is substantiated it does suggest as the president just said this is a game changer and we'll act accordingly. you ask what if. i'm not going to get
. >>> and now syria. the assad regime and rebel forces are accusing one another of using chemical weapons. syrian state media reported that rebel forces launched a chemical attack killing at least two dozen people, injuring more than 100 people. rebels deny that charge vehemently and accuse regime forces of shelling a town near damascus with chemical rockets. our senior international reporter is in amman, jordan, this morning. i know there are a lot of questions to substantiating the claims. what do we know so far? >> reporter: most of the information is coming from syrian state tv. and that's claiming that at least 25 people were killed in some kind of an attack in a village. scores of people wounded. and then syrian state tv playing interviews with some of the alleged victims who were saying that they smelled chlorine and almost all aping the same message, is this the freedom that the free syrian army rebels want? so some of those statements do come out to be a little suspect. neither side has been entirely truthful when it comes to the information and media war over syria. now very qui
that we're evaluating it. >> and assad has used scud missiles, fighter planes and other military assets to try to squash the two year uprising, upwards of 70,000 lives have been lost. and president obama, as megyn mentioned, says that either moving the chemical weapons around or using them would cross a quote, unquote, red line that would cause the president to change his calculus about the hands-off posture that the u.s. has adopted in the conflict. there were reports that the assad regime used against he the opposition forces, incapacitating thing called agent 15, which incapacitates your nervous system and causes hallucinations. >> megyn: thank you, the state department weighed in moments ago as we were going to air, saying that it remains, quote, quite concerned that assad's government will resort to nonconventional weapons. that doesn't tell us whether they have today, but they remain quite concerned that the government will. now, james just mentioned, it was just last august that president obama issued a warning, and as i mentioned, about chemical weapons in syria. no matter which
, president bashar al-assad and his associates are resorting increasingly with other indiscriminate capabilities that terrorize innocent syrians and increase further the flow of refugees out of syria. former secretary panetta discussed the possibility of more robust options for military support last year. and he agreed to bring this matter to his counterparts in brussels. the recent decisions by the french and the british that provided assistance directly to the syrian opposition suggests that the position and nato is by no means unified. admiral come i hope you will provide us with some concept of our current thinking compared to that of our european partnerships, as it relates to syria and possible additional roles for the alliance beyond the deployment. eucom responsibilities include managing military engagement and cooperation, including through the nato and russia council. this includes russia's cooperation with the coalition equipment out of afghanistan, along the northern distribution network through russia and over 110 military to military activities between our two militari
going on between the assad regime and rebels, all this talk in the past 48 hours about possible chemical weapons being used. this is very close to where the president is going to be. and then if you go beyond this, and you move over here to iran, look, here is israel over here, here is syria, here is iraq. here is iran over here. iran is about the size of alaska. you may notice at this point, it is all out here, sort of receiptireceipt i reddish looking. they may be a year away from having a nuclear weapon. the reason this is red is this is the range of the shehadeh 3 missile from iran. it easily reaches over here to israel and that's important to bear in mind, because all this is happening in the small place. here is a simple way to describe it. if you went from tehran directly over to tel aviv, this is the distance from boston to chicago. you cross only four or five states in the united states to cover all that ground and all of these issues, wolf, are happening in this really relatively small area and as we pointed out, right in the middle, here is iraq, some of the turmoil that happe
issue by president obama who warned syria's dictator bashar al-assad that he should not cross that line. bill: the white house has been briefed and the white house has to make some decisions in this. i think the days are becoming more desperate and the regime is more desperate and we know where the chemical weapons are, end quote. peter doocy leads the coverage in washington. how certain are the lawmakers that chemical weapons have been used, peter? >> reporter: not 100% certain, bill but senator feinstein says lawmakers have seen the same intelligence the white house has seen. mike rogers the chairman of the house intelligence committee said in an interview about syria i have a high probability to believe that chemical weapons were used w we need the final verification. i, mike rogers, chairman. intelligence committee would come to the conclusion they are either positioned for use or ready to do that or in fact have been used. if a final verification about chemical weapons use is made, congressman rogers says the united states is morally obligated to take out syria's weapons delivery s
. >> the violence is not going to stop unless and until assad understands that he can't shoot his way out of, this that the better course of action, if he wants to save his country is to allow a transition to better government. >> this new amateur video out of syria while impossible to authenticate shows the fighting apparently raging in key centers including homes in damascus. as a leader of the main syrian rebel group is throwing his support behind the formation of an interim government whose leader may be tomorrow in istanbul, turkey, shep. >> shepard: nations have long avoided during this conflict the idea of sending weapons directly to the rebels. that's changed or no? >> it seems to have changed. at a news conference with the australian foreign minister a short time ago. secretary of state john kerry really opened the door stating the u.s. does not stand in the way of other countries, whether it's france or britain or anyone else who wants to it arm the opposition. >> so as long as the president assad continues to attack his own people with scuds, with aircraft, with tanks, there is an
about whether a cornered al assad might hit jerusalem or israel. it was dramatic and it made me wonder if we missed something. i wonder what you're sense of where we are on this matter today is. >> reporter: well, it still is confusing. there are reports all over the map. prime minister netanyahu's intelligence minister today telling army radio that there are suggestions to him that chemical weapons in fact were used by the syrian government. but there was a hearing on capitol hill where in fact there were lawmakers kicking it around and the u.s. embassador to syria said we don't know this as a fact yet. it needs to be investigated. the embassador echoed what president obama said. another key republican, mike rogers, the house intelligence chairman, was on cbs news this morning and said he thinks, it appears to him, chemical weapons were used but he's a former fbi official who wants to see forensic evidence. that's important for a republican lawmaker to underline saying we need evidence before we say chemical weapons were used. >> ed henry on a historic day in jerusalem. we look forwar
. president obama says he's skeptical assad used chemical weapons. >> we have been clear that the use of chemical weapons guess against the syrian people would be a mistake. >> by the way, netanyahu agrees with president obama on syria conservatives tried to use our relationship with israel to grab votes. they accused president obama of not getting it. and some called him the most antiisrael president in history. bb set the record straight. >> i want to thank you for the investment you've made in our relationship and strengthening the alliance between our countries. the president has reaffirmed more than any other president, israel's right and duty to defend itself against any threat. so it's a pro found honer to host you, the leader of the free world, at this historic time in our ancient capital. welcome to israel. >> let's turn to policy analyst for the center for american progress. let me start with you. we see these conciliatory gestures being offered by prime minister netanyahu, but that's different than the lecture he gave to obama in his own digs in the white house. what accoun
don't know enough facts about what happened. the assad regime claimed the opposition used chemical weapons. the opposition claimed the assad regime used them. our ambassador in syria, by the way is in washington, there was no chemical weapons attack at all. here is the bottom line for the united states. these weapons can not be allowed to exit syria. they can in the be allowed to get out of the country to fallnto the happened of al qaeda or other terrorist groups to be used against the united states. melissa: what are the odds of that happening? >> i think they're high. i think the assad regime is in disarray. we can not have confidence. they continue it have command-and-control over those chemical weapons. it h been a goal of al qaeda for decades to get weapons of mass destruction and this may be a real opportunity for them. it's a very dangerous situation. melissa: so what does it mean for stability in the region if we are, sort of at odds as you describe it with israel on some different issues if they perceive us not chiefing close to our traditional partner and ally in the area
concerned that assad president -- president assad cornered desperate, may turn to these sort of chemical weapons. now, if and as you heard there, it is a big if, if any chemical weapon was used today, unlikely that was sara ran or mustard gas. schedule one chemicals according to the chemical weapons geneva convention. more likely according to some witnesses it was chlorine there was according to at least one witness a smell of chlorine in the air. that is only a schedule 3 chemical weapon. that could provide wiggle room for any western governments talking about red lines here, shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt in our newsroom in new york. well, a moment for the history books on an a spectacular day in rome. and he sure looked like the people's pope. the new pontiff, pope francis got an upclose and personal with followers young and old as thousands turned up for the inauguration of pope francis. plus, winter is coming to a nasty end. another one-two punch of snow and rain hammering the east. what to expect now ahead from the journalists of fox news on this tuesday fox report. congratulation
anything else in syria. >> in syria, you think it's time? >> the day after assad leaves, the biggest fear is where do the chemical weapons go? remember what happened in libya? all of these weapons are in the middle east. when assad falls we need an international coalition and we'll be part of it to secure the ten or 12 weapons sites that have the weapons. if we don't control those chemical weapons we'll be in real trouble down the road. >> the countries, many have war fatigue. >> yes. >> when you raise the thoughts of boots on the ground in syria, most people chills go up their spine. >> i totally get it. here is what i hope we're not tired of, defending ourselves against weapons of mass destruction. and the question for the american people at large, who gets the weapons when assad falls, radical islamists or control them so we make sure they're not in the bad guy's in general. i'm sorry the war is going on so long and the i want the people at large to say we're war weary, but trust me if we let the weapons get into the iran or islamist hands. it has to be a footprints-- >> and what about
the forum to deliver another stern warning to the assad regime in syria next door. >> we will not tolerate the use of chemical weapons against the syrian people or the transfer of those weapons to terrorists. the world is watching, we will hold you accountable. >> and he was cheered for his commitment on iran. >> america will do what we must to prevent a nuclear-armed iran. >> earlier in the west bank, president obama met with the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas. only hours after a stark reminder of the region's dangers as militants in gaza fired several rockets into southern israel. in ramallah today, the president also reversed course, no longer demanding that israel freeze settlements before peace talks resume on borders and israeli security. >> and that's not to say settlements are not important, it is to say that if we solve those two problems, the settlement problem will be solved. so i don't want to put the cart before the horse. >> and "meet the press," why is our own chuck todd pushing his luck with the president? >> chuck, you're just incorrigible. >> we'll have more on that
are being used in syria by the assad regime or by rebel groups? what do you think? >> i don't know but chairman rogers, highly respected chairman of the intelligence committee has access to information that very select leaders have in this country. so when he is drawing a conclusion it is likely it is probable, i think we have to take him at his word. i believe also before our government would take any action, they would have to actually confirm that chemical weapons were used. heather: you know syrian president assad, he released some pictures, he released some video. i have, i believe we have some of that, that he says proves that rebel forces used chemical weapons on this attack. he alleges it happened on march 19th in aleppo. just from you viewing this video, taking a look at these pictures, can you yourself tell, i mean, you can't tell if chemical weapons were in fact used here but president assad says this is proof. >> well certainly doctors after a period of time would be able to determine that to be sure. whether we could get accurate information from assad's medical system
his own reasons for wanting to have assad in power. is a kinship between shia and alouites, is a concern that if his government is toppled it puts pressure on sectarian tensions within their record to help us understand why the maliki government is taking the position it is, regarding the conflict in syria. >> you look for simple explanations. many international jihadis entered iraq and committed acts. whether they facilitated or not, they did not stop it. in 2009 after a particular set of horrific bombings, maliki wanted to take them to a criminal court. it looks like rushing, when people see an uprising in spirit, it looks like iraq in 1990, 1991. how did this come about? --is simplistic to say that more the issue is maliki and shia is they must see the threat facing them in the same way that iran sees the threat, and by the threats, i mean this fear of the sunni regime's getting together, coming together to overthrow the shia regime of assad and then overthrowing the shia regime in baghdad. is this fear of the alternative. it is fear is assad is on the turn, that people
to the syrian army through iraqi air space. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic. and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are, in fact, helping to sustain president assad. there are members of congress and people in america who increasingly are watching what iraq is doing, and wondering how it is that a partner in the efforts for democracy and a partner for whom americans feel they have tried so hard to be helpful, how that country can be, in fact, doing something that makes it more difficult to achieve our common goals. >> nbc's mike taibbi is live for us in akabul, afghanistan. mike, let's talk. this is not a photo op. this is some tough talk from john kerry. how is it being received? >> well, it has been tough talk from secretary of state john kerry, and you wonder how spirited the discussions are going to be with afghan president hamid karzai. they're meeting and now there will be a joint press conference later. the two men know each other. kerry has made five previous trips here when he was a senator. but there have been strained rel
before assad goes. jessica yellin is live from amman, jordan where that press conference just wrapped. jessica, the president said assad would go but sounded perhaps a little annoyed about being asked how that might happen. why was he seemingly annoyed? >> well, jake, we counted and this is the sixth time that the president or a member of his administration has said assad must go just in the last month alone. but none of them has laid out a plan or a path for direct action by the united states to help remove assad from power. without any direct military intervention by the u.s. the president knows he is vulnerable to criticism. that he is standing by while a massacre is taking place and that is a particularly sharp and poignant charge when he is standing here in jordan where they are providing refuge to some 7,000 syrians who are fleeing for safety every day. some 7,000 people crossing the border into jordan from syria each day because of the violence there. >> i believe the king abdullah of jordan said that the settlements of refugees now form something like the fifth largest town in
the ancient city of petra. ramp up criticism of syrian president bashar assad. >> ed henry is live this morning in amman jordan with the very latest. good morning, ed. >> good toe sue i goose, interesting. because as you know you have got syria on jordan's northern border. and there are hundreds of thousands of refugees spilled out because of that ongoing civil war. all that strife. the violence, president assad killing his own people. they are winding up here in jordan. many of them and there is a lot of pressure building. damaging his economy big time pressure on president obama at home all around the world to intervene in some way. carl levin saying saying there should be some kind of surgical air strike. maybe the president should help set up a no-fly zone around syria to pressure assad. the bottom line is the president at a news conference here yesterday said he feels like it's a situation where is he damned if he does, damned if he doesn't. take a listen. >> your question may be suggesting is why haven't we simply gone in militarily? and, you know, i think it's fair to say th
as the alternative to president bashar al assad in syria. he is from texas and elected early this morning as the leader of the opposition and could be the first prime minister if the government of al assad is ever toppled. >>> to a close call for thousands of college students walking around campus with a heavily armed gunman in their midst but police swooped down on the university of central florida before their fellow student could carry out his plot. here's pierre thomas with the latest. >> reporter: hundreds at the university of central florida evacuated as word broke of a gunman on campus. >> the cops had guns and were telling everyone to run. >> we noticed something was wrong because we saw a policeman with a big rifle and everything. >> reporter: it turns out the students may have narrowly escaped a pass kerr. >> it could have been a very bad day. >> reporter: police believe that james was going to set them up for slaughter. his roommate warned police and police responded within minutes. >> and found the subject dead from a single gunshot wound to the head. >> reporter: the evidence
-- in iraq. >> of syria, we got off on the wrong foot. the president declared publicly that assad of syria has to go. that was a trustee had to make. that he made. one would assume that declaring a publicly involves a commitment by the united states, which the united states is prepared then to make effective. and that therefore we have the means and strategy for achieving and objective. -- that objective. as soon turned out this was rhetorical, without a real capacity for follow-through. so we went to the un and demanded the security council support us on this. andrussians and chinese said we do not share this conclusion and we will not join you in forcing assad out and we object of the resolution fell. the russians and chinese, having engaged in this stance that is infantile and disgusting, the words used by our ambassador to the un, which is not a way of soliciting their report for -- their support for further comment policy. policy.n it became clear that the opposition, some of it involves some of our friends, some of it involves the infiltration of al qaeda types into syria. some of it
join the effort of others to arm the opposition? how long will assad stay in power? that changes on almost a day-to-day basis because the situation is so uncertain as it enters the third year. the president is a bit defensive because people ask where was the world's biggest super power? you are supposed to be the voice of humanitarian needs around the world. how could you let this go on so long? why haven't you done more? the president said today at the news conference the united states from the start was calling on assad to step down and we know if you look at the calendar it is simply not true. many other countries were ahead of the united states in calling for assad to step down but it's a tough one for the president. he is right in the sense the united states used military force in this region from the beginning, there is still a big hangover from the iraq war in this part of the world. it would have been controversial. all the choices are difficult. he does get a bit defensive when that question is posed, wolf. >> he certainly does at least that is the impression you get fro
to help assad. the united states has only pressured the iraqis privilege atly up until now. the fact they are doing so publicly and sharing intelligence means the shaming of iraq now begins. fox news was the first organization to report on the freight. the combination of everything from syrian airliners to shankar go planes. eye rain wran cargo planes, supply anything that syria needs. money, weapons and ammunition, soldiers. all those kinds of things from tehran into various bases all around syria. western intelligence sources confirmed to fox news that the video you are watching now is amateur video of those planes landing inside of syria. of course, no secrets the flights take place multiple times a week. it is no secret that the iranians support the syrians. what has the united states so upset is the fact the iraqis are allowing the pilots to go over their air space. the fact that secretary kerry is making intelligence a public matter rather than privately talking to iranians shows just how angry the u.s. is with the iraqis that -- it has not been stopped. the united states is in
war continues to rage on, president bashar al-assad and his associates are resorting increasingly with other indiscriminate capabilities that terrorize innocent syrians and increase further the flow of refugees out of syria. former secretary panetta discussed the possibility of more robust options for military support last year. and he agreed to bring this matter to his counterparts in brussels. the recent decisions by the french and the british that provided assistance directly to the syrian opposition suggests that the position and nato is by no means unified. admiral come i hope you will provide us with some concept of our current thinking compared to that of our european partnerships, as it relates to syria and possible additional roles for the alliance beyond the deployment. eucom responsibilities include managing military engagement and cooperation, including through the nato and russia council. this includes russia's cooperation with the coalition equipment out of afghanistan, along the northern distribution network through russia and over 110 military to military activitie
described as spirited, no breakthrough was achieved. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are in fact hipping to sustain president assad. >> talks also focused on iraq's transition to democracy as it prepares for upcoming elections at a time when violence is on the rise. >> all right, here's your first look at your dish of scrambled politics. they're warming to the idea of same-sex marriage but many oppose marriage equality. karl rove signaled there could be a major shift in his party's outlook. >> karl rove, could you imagine a republican candidate saying i'm for gay marriage? >> i could. >> the supreme court begins arguments on it, the legality and one benefit to endorsing the notion with one strategist te telling politico opening up the idea will open up donors around the country. >>> zuckerberg is forming an issues advocacy organization focusing on comprehensive immigration reform. >>> rand paul doesn't want to legalize drugs but doesn't want them to go to jail either. >> the l
they are looking into allegations while white house press secretary issued a warning to the assad regime. >> we have no evidence to substantiate the charge that the opposition has used chemical weapons. warn the regime against making these kind of charges as any kind of pretext or cover for its use of chemical weapons. >> neither side has provided any documentation that chemical agents have been used. but following intelligence briefings the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committees say they believe president assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i think the days are becoming more desperate, the regime is more desperate. we know where the chemical weapons are. it's not a secret that they're there. and i think the probabilities are very high that we're going into some very dark times. and i think the white house needs to be prepared. >> i have a high probability to believe that chemical weapons were used. we need the final verification. given everything we know over the last year and a half, i would come to the conclusion that they are either positioned
the chemical weapons and if they did, that would suggest the assad stockpile has fallen into their hands. the regime is saying the rebels did have it, but the assad regime are the ones with the large chemical stockpile. once again no definitive proof they were used at all, but a serious development. >> one that the president had spoken about hypothetically back in august when he used the words red line. here he was in august. >> we have been very clear to the assad regime, but also to other players on the ground that a red line for us is we start seeing a whole bunch of chemical weapons moving around or being utilized. that would change my calculus. >> so if the reports are true and i know you're careful not to say that we -- we don't know at this point in time. if they are, how might the international community act in response? >> reporter: it's very unlikely you would see u.s. or western military boots on the ground. what we have seen a move towards in the last few months is suggestion of arming the rebels. john kerry saying just yesterday he wouldn't say in the way if the uk and franc
's a long standing syria through the decline or democrat myself of the assad regime, which i think is inevitable, will be a serious blow to iran. >> so if you have washington, sir, on one side of the scale and tehran on the other, who does baghdad more closely align with? >> well, our hope is, of course, that it will be a truly democratic regime which will be primarily loyal to the interests of the people in iraq and that their views will be consistent with others in supporting and strengthening democratic institutions. but as with many of the other countries in the middle east, there are a whole series of conflicting interests there and it will play out over a long period of time. but our interest is in democratic institutions, democratic societies who will serve their people and not be so much interested in the kinds of conflicts that have raged for so long in that region. >> you mentioned your hopes are for the inevitable assad regime there in syria. but today one of the national coalition, the head of that resigned. he was the key u.s. ally among the rebels. how big of a blow i
, to prop up assad in syria and that this is something that americans and the congress, that the administration, cannot understand or tolerate, and as kerry told us afterwards, it was a very spirited conversation, because he got a lot of pushback from maliki. maliki argued that assad is facing extremists in this country. so he basically, even though he's not terrible sympathetic with assad politically, assad staying in power is very important for maliki's domestic politics because he fears a takeover by the rebels would actually lead to rebellion fact. the message from kerry was pretty tough. that congress is losing patience with iraq and that maliki will not have any role in the political decisions to come once assad falls with this pll political transition being worked out with international leaders, if he continues to help iran prop up assad. >> there are reports also that the head of the syrian opposition coalition reports that he resigned this post at some point today. what do we know about that, and what kind of complications could that present for the united stat
, maybe chlorine gas, that's not nerve agents. i think that assad may have been testing the waters. if chemicals were used, you've got to watch if he's going to use them in the future as the situation grows increaselying desperate and feels he has nothing to do lose, but meanwhile for us and for the israelis, apart from the geopolitical mess and instability, the real and present danger is chemical weapons falling into the hands of islamist fanatics. we are apparently, i'm told, we're told, we're working on a plan to deal with that militarily if necessary, but if we have to, megyn, it's going to be ugly and tough and messy. >> megyn: and i wanted just to clarify so it was the israeli minister of intelligence and strategic affairs who says it's apparently clear that a chemical weapons were used in syria and that that alleged attack will be a main topic of conversation between those two leaders today. ralph stand by, i'd love to hear from you on the opposite side of this presser to get some context on what we're about to hear. if the israelis are saying that syria has crossed the red
or others. he believes that we need to change president assad's calculation. >> there has been disagreement in the past in, within the cabinet. we now know that hillary clinton and the c.i.a. director and others wanted some, and the defense team as well, leon panetta, wanted to arm the rebels. the president is still dead set against that. we don't know where secretary kerry comes down. is this an issue where the president is going to have to move under pressure from allies? >> i think this is an issue that the people at the white house wrestle with every single day. the human cost of assad's actions are horrific. and we struggle with the human toll and hearing these stories from the region, about innocent people that are suffering. so what the president has done is rejected this notion that either we arm them or we're not supporting them. there's been enormous diplomatic effort put behind helping the opposition. there's been considerable money, hundreds of millions of dollars in humanitarian relief and nonlethal assistance to the opposition. we simply haven't taken a step towards a military
press has said they use cyprus banks to fund the assad regime. the other thing i wanted to mention, larry, since the beginning of the year, putin has wanted to reduce the exposure of russian oil garbages abroad and actually started since february to use cyprus a little bit, yes. i think -- less. they prefer the leathnetherland prove some of their money. and putin has wanted to exempt cyprus from some of this -- to protect cyprus as a haven, even as some of his cronies are moving their money further west, anticipating some kind of disaster, just as has happened, in fact. so they're not entirely taken by surprise. >> no. i don't think anybody is. i mean, i think everybody knew this was going to happen. and it's happening. >> but, larry, the bottom line is, the risk of allowing a run on the cypriot banks is so significant, that it's worth it to let russia come in. >> i agree. >> and put $5 billion down. and basically stabilize the situation, rather than have it be done some other way, which would involve the euro. >> i don't see how they can avoid a run oppose on the banks, one way or
, both the assad regime and the rebels are blaming one another for the deadly rocket blasts that killed the at least 31 people and that included 21 civilians. now, according to reuters photographer who was on the ground, people were seen suffocating in the streets and the air apparently smelled of chlorine. it's unclear who is behind the attack, the white house is expressing skepticism over the regime's claim that it was the rebels. >> at this time we have no evidence to substantiate that charge and we're skeptical deeply of a regime that might make that charge given that the regime has lost all credibility in the eyes of the syrian people and the world. having said that we're obviously assessing the reports and without getting into intelligence matters, i can tell you that we're making evaluations about the reports. >> sean: now, as the obama administration continues to make assessments about the developing situation overseas, questions are raised if the u.s. should intervene in the civil war. the president said the chemical weapons against the syrian people would constitute a red line
, consorting with iran and rearming assad undercuts all of the international efforts to get assad out of there. so by propping up assad in a hot war, if you will, in a civil war where 70,000-plus people have already died, al maliki has become more of a problem than a solution. >> andrea mitchell as always, going to where the news is. thank you for the perspective from the room. much appreciated. >> christopher hill is the former u.s. ambassador to iraq and the dean of the corbell school of international studies at denver university and joins us to talk more about the situation. now ambassador hill, i want to to talk about andrea used the phrase "an erratic figure" to describe president karzai, particularly after his comments of the alleged u.s. collusion with the taliban that he is now saying was a misunderstanding. can we trust karzai after the behavior he has exhibited over the last three and a half weeks? >> i think we know karzai pretty well we've dealt with him for a long time. and i think secretary kerry in particular has a kind of personal relationship with him. i think with respect to
control. 70,000 syrians have died in two years of fighting between rebels and president bashar al assad's forces. analysts say some in the coalition see hitto as an outsider. they also doubt rebel groups which are not part of the coalition will accept an interim government. >>> u.s. military leaders are showing off some high-tech hardware they could use against north korea. pilots taking part in a joint exercise with south korea are flying missions using b-52 bombers. the aircraft are capable of launching nuclear missiles and can simultaneously strike multiple targets. the u.s. military has b-52s at its bases in south korea. defense department spokesman george little said the b-52 missions are meant to be a deterrent. he said the aim is to demonstrate the u.s. military's capabilities to north korea. scientists in north korea conducted a third test in the month. they said they were scrapping the truce that ended fighting in the korean war. >>> in new york, north korea's representative to the united nations has justified his country's possession of nuclear arms. he says it's a way to coun
of fighting between rebels and president bashar al assad's forces. analysts say some in the coalition see hitto as an outsider. they also doubt rebel groups which are not part of the coalition will accept an interim government. >>> people across iraq are looking back at a war that caused many problems. u.s. forces invaded their country. saddam hussein collapsed, but it continued on much longer. nhk world's sho beppu covered the war and its aftermath. he's now back in baghdad. sho, how are things in the iraqi capital now? >> reporter: right. i can say that it changed quite a lot compared to those worse days. it seems lively, at least on the surface, streets in baghdad are busy, especially in the center. roads are jammed with cars, and the shops are packed with people. residents who sought refuge elsewhere, in iraq or across the country, are returning. oil production levels are back to what they were before the war, about 3 million barrels a day. companies have built modern shopping malls to take advantage of the growing buying power of consumers. but iraqis still face the threat of violenc
. but at the white house, president obama's spokesman late any blame on the assad government. >> deeply skeptical of a regime that lost all credibility and we one the regime against making these kinds of charges as any pretax or cover for its use of chemical weapons. >> whether in fact they casualty's were caused by chemical weapon has not been verified. al jazeera asked a leading expert to examine the hospital video and accounts of the attack. his conclusion, the casualties were not consistent with syria's reputed stockpile of chemical agents. >> if i had to make a quick decision, i would take out any sort of nominal chemical warfare agent and i would focus more on the -- if it is a chemical warfare agent, it is not working very well. >> the have often accused the syrian military of using chemical weapons but this is the first time the government made the same accusation against them. a syrian government official said the attack would be reported to human rights organizations but did not indicate whether outside experts would be given free access to investigate the attack. become aer, iraq has r
weapons have been used. they are not sure who used them, the rebels or the assad regime. the united states government has confirmed any of that but we will hear from the president. he has talked about the use of chemical weapons as a red line when it comes to syria. president will overnight here. tomorrow heads to the west bank, next day to jordan and an overnight stay with king abdullah. reporting from jerusalem, this is chuck todd, nbc news. >>> okay, chuck. thanks. we are waiting for that special report in israel. other news now drones debated on capitol hill today as the senate committee discusses the potential for domestic use. various law enforcement agencies, including alameda county sheriff's office have floated the idea of using drones for community surveillance. the unmanned aircraft are already being used by businesses and agriculture. but critics have raised concerns about privacy. drones took the spotlight a few weeks ago during kentucky senator rand paul's 13-hour filibuster on the senate floor when he discussed the possibility of drone strikes against u.s. citizens. >>> a bi
forces accuse each other of using chemical weapons. president bashar al assad's administration said rebels fired a missile containing a chemical substance at the northern city of aleppo. opposition fighters tell a different story. they say government forces carried out two chemical attacks one in aleppo and one in damascus. syria's u.s. ambassador bashar jaafari says his government has asked the u.s. secretary-general to launch an independent probe. the security council held a closed door session on wednesday. after the meeting, russia's representative expressed support for the syrian government. >> i do hope that the secretary-general is going to act on that invitation expeditiously. >> britain's envoy is backing the opposition. >> but it is the syrian regime which has stockpiles of chemical weapons and materials in syria. >> deputy ambassador parham says a number of council members will ask the secretary-general for a probe that also considers the opposition's claims. u.s. president barack obama wants to know exactly what happened in syria. he calls the use of chemical weapons a g
was an outspoken supporter of assad. >>> a major shut down has been confirmed for the third largest school district in the nation. chicago mayor rahm emanuel i announced thursday the city will plan 54 schools which is 8% of the district. the mayor called the closings a tough but necessary choice citing many half empty public school buildings. opponents who turned out to protest said the closures will endanger students in troubled areas who may have to cross gang boundaries to attend classes. they think the closures will save millions. >>> gun legislation set to hit the senate floor next month will include universal background checks. this according to harry reid who introduced the bill last night. he's vowing that any bill that passes the senate must include background checks. the most contentious part of the measure. reid promised votes on a proposed assault weapons ban and limits on high capacity magazines. the legislation aims to make gun trafficking a federal crime and strengthen safety measures at schools. yesterday john lennon was thrust into the gun debate. his widow drew attention to the ca
of for a key bashar al-assad. .e was a sunni muslim the u.s. has opposed sanctions imposed sanctions on a rebel group in northern mali. they have banned americans from doing business with it. the group was recently pushed out of northern mali french-led troops. two italian marines accused of killing a pair of indian fishermen last year are being sent back to india to face charges. >> the two men are being sent back to india. they are accused of shooting dead two fishermen off india's southern coast in february of last year. >> italy has informed to us they will be sending back the marines to india. marines had been part of a military security team protecting this tanker. they say they fired on the fishermen thinking they were pirates. dead deaths -- the deaths demonstrations. the families of the dead have been demanding compensation and they want the marines tried in india. i would urge the indian government and the court to give us justice. marines have twice been allowed to leave india on bail. the second time, they did not come back. the italian government refused to return the pair, despite
supporter of president assad has taken place in damascus. putin's most -- biggest critics has been found lead in london. berezovsky's death is being treated as a suicide. emma, has there been any sort of reaction yet to boris berezovsky's death in russia? >> yes, in the last few hours, fell he isity. putin's press secretary goes on russian tv and said berezovsky had written to the president in recent months saying he wanted to come back to russia and he was apologizing for the mistakes he had made. of course we have no verification of that from the peam amend -- family and reaction to this will very much depend on which side of the fence people sit on. to some he was very much a hero, he fought against putin, but to others they say he didn't seem like that at all. >> yeah, just talk us through why he was so famous and well known. he had been for many years the very heart of power in russia, hadn't he? >> absolutely, felicity, and he had a real fall from grace here, if you like. he started as a mathematician, then made millions and millions importing and selling mercedes cars. he helped p
video shows what activists say is assad's car after the attack. al jazeera cannot independently verify its authenticity. the former commander was heavily involved with opposition fighters in syria. he has crossed into turkey for treatment. syria national coalition president stepped down, he will attend the arab league summit in doha. to the leadadmitted on sunday. it is not clear if he is attending on his own accord or representing the fmc because they have not accepted his resignation yet. our colleague joins us live from the meeting. his us how you think presence will be received at the meeting. i think he will be welcomed by most of the attendees because the prime minister of qatar did invite him as well as the interim prime minister to attend the summit on tuesday. resignation,prise the prime minister said this is something he regrets. he called on him to reconsider his decision other sources attending a foreign ministers' meeting will probably suggest the same. this is an historic moment for the syrian opposition. calling on the arab league months ago to give seat to the syrian op
to rebels inside syria, offering an alternative to the government of bashar al-assad, who's been a bad person. we want to see him go. man, andng this other information technology executive who lives in texas, and it goes on to say he is of kurdish dissent and may have seen a plus since he has been criticized for not reaching out to syria more. some council members say he was the choice of syria's muslim brotherhood, a group that had been banned and persecuted under the assad regime and that played a powerful role. then it goes on to say that mr. hito advocated for muslim americans as a representative of the council on american-islamic relations. concerningghtly particularly since i have all these different families of all different denominations and faiths telling me of their concerns of what takes place with some of the people currently in syria. for aadquarters, the need new fbi headquarters has been in the news lately. received 35 proposals from developers and communities in the metro area interested in hosting a new headquarters building. can you bring the committee updates first w
give some very specific messages. he repeated his warning to the assad regime not to dare use chemical weapons, which are of course a direct threat to israel as well, saying that the united states will respond. and he made a very strong iron-clad commitment on iran, another thing that israelis want to hear. >> you know, interesting you mention the heckler and you talk about the charm offensive. i believe it has been called operation desert schmooze by "the atlantic." he handled that very well. he got some laughs when he said, i wouldn't feel comfortable here if i hadn't been heckled at least once during a speech. but andrea, the genesis of all of this, and really as you talk about this being the crux of this particular trip, peace is necessary, peace is just, peace is possible. do you think those are the sentiments that are truly reflected there in israel? do you think people believe that peace could be possible? is there any kind of a time frame that you ever hear people say, if only this could happen, that could happen? >> israel is prosperous, but israel is now threatened by all of
who called for active approach to take out president bashar assad, from no-fly zone to airstrike. >> it's tragic. it's heart-breaking. the sight of children and women being slaughtered that we have seen so much i think has to compel all of us to say what more can we do? >> king abdullah is also under pressure. since a refugee camp alone is now the fifth largest city in jordan. there is also fear extremists will spread chemical weapons from syria to jordan and israel. abdullah resisted any foreign military intervention and today visibly winced as a reporter asked if it would provide asylum. the president tid penal is $200 million more in u.s. taxpayer assistance to jordan for refugee and scored diplomatic victory by getting israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu to patch things up by phone with his turkish counterpart after a bitter spat that could have hendered u.s. efforts to get turkey's help on syria. the president visited the church of the nativity in bethlehem and continued outreach to the people. although a stop at the holocaust museum in jerusalem may have provided a ch
. to the kingdom of jordon he announced an additional $2 million of u.s. aid. >> i am confident assad will go. it's not a question of if, it's when. >> asked how that will happen, he struck a defensive note. >> it's fair to say that the united states often finds itself in a situation where it goes in military it is criticized and if it doesn't then people say, why don't you go in militarily? >> reporter: former allies whose three year stand off had ripples across the region. >> timing was good for that conversation to take place. i discussed it with prime minister netanyahu and pwoeftbo us agreed the moment was right, and fortunately they were able to begin the process of rebuilding the relations between two important countries in the region. >> reporter: concerning back to syria, jordon's king abdullah offered assad asylum in jordon, but when asked if that offer still stands, he did not renew the pledge. >>> in other news, a 10-year-old boy is dead this morning. one other person clinging to live after a display sign fell on them in an airport in birmingham, alabama. the report was the sign of ar
it a significant esklation of the assad regime. >> the carnage grows. the port is building in the west to give weapons to syrian rebels. cnn's nick peyton walsh is joining us from beirut. let's start with the rockets fired into lebanon. how close to the capitol did they come? >> reporter: it was still pretty far out in the border region between lebanon and syria. very mountainous, indistinct where the border is. we understand two war planes hit derelict buildings, but governments tried to keep out of the fighting with a policy that calls disassociation. the concern is not that this will get a government or military response back to syria, but it might ignite the sectarian tensions inside lebanon, which pretty much mirror those that play in syria. also point out, wolf, rebels unleashing a barrage of rockets in central damascus, too. a real uptick in violence today, wolf. >> when it comes to arming the rebels, looks like there's a change emerging from the united states. what's going on? >> reporter: well, john kerry came out today and said quite clearly that he would not stand in the way of alli
distress over the king of the assad regime. they are more relaxed about that. a much more relaxed about egypt. u.s. orof believing the "-- will reorder the middle east, i find that this is a sober kind of summit, about what is doable, and what is not doable. there is a lot about the new israeli government, which i am happy to discuss in the question and answer. thank you very much. >> thank you. mike? >> thank you. it is good to be doing this. it is good to be on this panel with my colleagues. one of the great strengths about the washington institute, which makes it so nice to work here, to have colleagues like dennis are a greatho source of wisdom on this topic. my dearest to have hd screens to have to watch me watch -- what to watch me eat lunch. we begin these things by saying, welcome mr. secretary, members of congress. nobody knows auntie be any different. [laughter] that is the benefit of live stream. i was asked to do this in part because the last presidential trip to the middle east, rather to israel, was not by president obama, but by president bush. worked for him at the time.
are saying that the more desperate bashar al assad becomes, the more dangerous he also becomes. >> we've been very clear about our concerns that the assad regime is increasingly beleaguered, that it finds that the violence that it is using by conventional means is inadequate, including its barbaric use of scuds so we are quite concerned that they will resort to other weapons. we've made clear that this would constitute a red line for the united states. the president could not have been clearer about it. >> there are no plans right now to put any boots on the ground. but last year, the pentagon did do a report analyzing what it would take to secure those chemical weapons. they concluded it may take up to 70,000 troops on the ground. >> all right, chris lawrence at the pentagon, thanks. in just a few minutes we're going to talk to israeli government spokesman mark regev about the latest in syria and the president's trip to israel. >>> a disturbing story from colorado. zoraida sambolin has that. >> this just in to cnn the executive director of colorado's corrections department shot and killed la
've seen middle east dictators show no hesitation to use these chemical agents before. assad's own father used them. 40,000 syrians killed in hama. saddam hussein didn't hesitate to use chemical weapons against his own people and the iranian people. we know there is pattern in the middle east. the question is whether or not it actually happened here. when president obama talks about the red line being crossed, use of chemical agents if in fact that is proven would be the red line and i would believe provoke u.s. military intervention. bill: doug, what do you think?. >> i couldn't agree with monica more. let's be clear. this is the interest of the united states and our only stable democratic ally in the region, israel. israelis said, two ministers said yesterday they have definitive evidence that chemical weapons have been used in aleppo. i think we need to prepare for the likelihood we will have to intervene militarily on the side of the coalition to end this. bill: senator feinstein two days ago said we need to be prepared for dark days and she was in a highly classified meeting along wi
on assad to step down because of the horrific violence being inflicted on the syrian people. jordan took a leading role in the political transition to a more stable government. we are looking at strengthening the syrian opposition. we share concerns about violence spilling across the borders. i want to make it clear. the united states is committed to the security of jordan, which is backed by our strong alliance. the jordanian people have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of some many refugees inevitably is showing. every day, they are far from home, but this is a heavy burden. the international community needs to step up and help shoulder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are these single largest donor of assistance to the syrian people. some of this has helped jordan, and i have been announcing that my administration will provide jordan with an additional $200 million in budget support as it cares for syrian refugees and jordanian communities affected by this crisis. this will mean more assistance with basic services including education for
spirited discussion on the subject of the over flights. anything that supports president assad is problematic and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the over flights in iran are, in fact, helping to sustain president assad and his regi regime. >> customer reported he left the meeting without reaching an agreement with maliki. those oppose to assad's government is trying to maintain a coalition after the backed opposition resigned. with the help of the cia, arab nations in turkey have sharply stepped up aid to the rebels. there is a troublesome straight line from afghanistan, where the secretary of state is this morning, through iran, through iraq, and into syria. >> i think the people who also have noticed this are the afghan leadersh leadership. so it's interesting. you have secretary hagel who does a visit. secretary kerry now doing the visit. the president hasn't been to afghanistan in a year now and other things taking his attention in the region whether iran and rising tensions with syria and economic challenges in jordan, et cetera. they are watching this stu
whether our policy is right. it's not too early to know how history will judge assad. that's easy. but in terms of whether or not we have proceeded in a more deliberate way than some would want us to, and probably a little more than i would want us to if you want to get into that, nonetheless the goal here is to make sure that what happens after assad is, is stable, is diverse, is not chaotic. that the right people are the ones that take over when assad goes. and that's, that's a matter of putting in place, if possible, a kind of an interim political coalition, which will have broad support inside of syria, which will not see a long period of retribution and violence following the fall of assad which will happen. and putting that in place to the extent that's possible is what is going on now. at the same time, supporting the opposition, at least those elements of the opposition which we believe are positive, constructive, progressive elements, but that are not the extreme element that otherwise could turn syria into a, if possible, hard to imagine, even, worst case, than is with a
important >> the u.s. ambassador to syria also discuss the allegations that the assad regime used chemical weapons. here is part of his testimony ao a house foreign affairs committee hearing. >> so far, we have no evidence to substantiate the reports that chemical weapons were used yesterday.emic but i want to underline that we are looking very carefullyea atd these reports. we are consulting with partners in the region and in the international community. more broadly, we have been very clear from the beginning about our concern that as the assad regime's military situation deteriorates and it becomes asrs the director of national intelligence said, it becomes ever more beleaguered, that it might be tempted to use chemicav weapons m. the president has been very clear in saying that if assad and those under his command makn the mistake of using chemical weaponsen or if they fail to met their obligation to secure them, then there will be consequenceso and they will be heldcu accountable.re >> what with those consequences be ? accountable. >> what would those consequences be, ambassador? >> m
in syria. we're all talking about the emphasis is on helping the resistance against president assad reach victory. obama keeps saying it's not matter of if but when president assad leaves. that's not really so sure. looking at the what's happening on the ground, the breakup of syria is more likely rather than a clear victory of one side winning or losing and president assad leaving the country altogether. so it's really a matter of the next step. what happens after whatever happens in syria. the threat is to the region. the countries on the borders of syria. turkey has its problems. jordan could well have its problems very soon. lebanon. so it's a very -- it's a situation that's very volatile. syria has been imploding and the fear, of course, is that it will explode. america's options -- what it needs to do is help the region formulate some kind of way of dealing with the problem inside syria. american troops on the ground very unlikely, but, of course, there are already special forces, american special forces, british special forces, and i believe french special forces inside jordan trai
at this point. malaki's focus is not having a regime in syria. our focus is not allowing assad to continue to exist. >> that's right. the shia regime doesn't want to see a sunni regime in syria. iran wants to maintain assad's power and iran is shipping weapons through iraq to syria. many people say it's those weapons and a lot of the training coming from iran that is propping up the aassad regime in syria. if we can cut that off, we might be able to cut off the weapons propping up in the assad regime. we can't get those flights to land, be inspected. if jordan has intelligence there's weapons on those flights we can't cut it off. it is a damned shame because we spent all that time, blood in iraq, we should have that type of relationship where we can stop that. instead we can't. >>brian: secretary of state condoleezza told us here that status agreement was written to be renegotiation before it was up. if that was renegotiated successfully we would have had presence in the region and you could argue there would not be the intertribal strife they're witnessing right now. therefore, we would h
by president assad. fortunately the syrian nuclear capacity was destroyed but unfortunately thousands of chemical weapons remain. we can not allow those weapons to fall in the terrorists hands. itco lead to an epic tragedy. there's an attempt to bring spring to the arab world. it is an arab choice. it is an arab initiative. it may bring peace to the region, freedom to the people, economic progress to arab states. if realized it can lead to a better tomorrow. we pray it will become a reality. the vision between skeptics and those who believe in peace. your voice will encourage belief. you came -- you came to us with the clear message that no one should let skepticism win the day. a vision that says clearly that peace is not only a wish but a possibility. i fully support your call. there is no other way to make the future better. there is no better leader to make it possible. your visit is an historic step in that direction. we shall share the journey with you all the way. thank you. >> thank you so much. well, thank you, president peres, for your very generous words and your warm welco
. the fact that hezbollah has allied the assad regime has stockpiles of chemical weapons only heightens the urgency. we will continue to cooperate closely to guard against that danger. i've made it clear to bashar al assad and all who follow his orders, we will not tolerate the use of chemical weapons against the syrian people or the transfer of those weapons to terrorists. the world is watching. we will hold you accountable. the syrian people have the right to be freed from the grip of a dictator who would rather kill his own people than relinquish power. assad must go, so that syria's future can begin. because true stability in syria depends upon establishing a government that is responsible to its people. one that protects all communities within its borders, while making peace with countries beyond them. these are the things i think about when i think about israel's security. when i consider israel's security, i also think about a people who have a living memory of the holocaust, faced with the prospect of a nuclear-armed iranian government who has called for israel's destruction. it
that hezbollah's ally assad's regime has sock piled rockets, we will guard against that. i made it clear to assad and all that follow his orders, we will chemicalate the use of weapons or the transfer of those weapons. the world is watching and we will hold you accountable. [applause] the syrian people have the right to be free from the grip of a dictator who would rather kill s own people than relinquish power. assad must go so a serious future can begin. because true stability in syria depends on establishing a government that is responsible to its people. one that protects all communities within its borders while making peace with countries beyond them. that this is what i think about when i think about israel's security. when i think about israel's security i also think about the people who have a living memory of the holocaust. faced with a government that is called for iran's disruption. no wound their israel views this as a threat. this is not simply a challenge for israel but it is a danger for the entire world, including the united states. [applause] a nuclear-armed iran will raise the r
. but maliki has his own reasons for wanting to have assad in power. is it the kinship between shia and alouites, is it a concern that if his government is toppled it puts pressure on sectarian tensions within iraq? help us understand why the maliki government is taking the position it is, regarding the conflict in syria. >> you look for simple explanations. many international jihadis entered iraq and committed acts. whether they facilitated or not, they did not stop it. in 2009 after a particular set of horrific bombings, maliki wanted to take them to a criminal court. it looks like saddam's regime, when people see an uprising in syria, it looks like iraq in 1990, 1991. how did this come about? it is simplistic to say that -- more the issue is maliki and shia is they must see the threat facing them in the same way that iran sees the threat, and by the threats, i mean this fear of the sunni regime's getting together, coming together to overthrow the shia regime of assad and then overthrowing the shia regime in baghdad. it is this fear of the alternative. it is fear is assad is on th
to president assad accused each other of firing chemical weapons that syrian state tv has said killed at least 25 people in the north of the country. the white house sounded a skeptical note but warned against any further escalation of violence. >> on that specific allegation, we have no evidence to substantiate the charge that the opposition has used chemical weapons. we are deeply skeptical of a regime that has lost all credibility and we would also warn the regime against making these kinds of charges as any kind of pretext or cover for its use of chemical weapons. >> but, of course, the other pressing issue for the international community is iran and its nuclear ambitions. despite years of severe economic sanctions, and continued pressure from the united nations, iran still seems intent on developing its nuclear capability. in an interview specially recorded for israeli tv in preparation for his visit, the president was unequivocal in his commitment to preventing a nuclear iran. >> when i'm consulting with beebee as i have over the last few years on this issue, my message to him will be th
assad is widely believed to have a chemical weapons arsenal, including nerve agents as well as mustard gas. the parliament of cyprus voted to reject a bill that would tax bank deposits in order to qualify for an international bailout package. to receive $13 billion from the e.u. and the international monetary fund, cyprus has to raise $7.5 billion on its own. but taxing people's bank accounts proved unpopular, even when the provision was added to shield small savers. banks across cyprus will remain closed until thursday to avoid a run on cash. uncertainty about the cyprus situation set markets around the world and on wall street on edge. the dow jones industrial average gained more than three points to close above 14,455. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3229. seven u.s. marines were killed after a mortar unexpectedly exploded during a training exercise in western nevada. military officials said that prompted the pentagon to halt the use of the mortar worldwide until an investigation can be completed. the accident happened last night at the hawthorne army depot. the marines who
the facts straight, but it points in the direction of some chemical weapons used. was it the assad regime or the opposition? >> and this is a huge difference if it's chemical weapons. so where do we go from there? president obama that's the red line that can'ti be passed. red lines come and go with this administration and i think that's part of the problem. i think we have to come back to what the basic american interest is here and that makes sure that no chemical weapons get outside of syria into the hands of terrorists. what that may mean if they're now in fact in use, we are going to have to take some steps to destroy weapons in stock piles in arsenals in syria. what we need to protect against is that we don't end up destroying whatever is left of assad's command and control structure in a way that actually sti actual actually facilitates the opposition. and i think the risk of the weapons exiting syria is high enough that we will have to look at using force right now. not against-- not on one side or the other in the hostilities, but to destroy the chemical weapons. >> greta: ambassa
. goodbye. >> its estimated 70,000 people have died since the start of protest against president assad in syria. today, house foreign affairs committee examines the student civil war and his from u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford. live coverage starts at 9:25 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> the federal open market committee is meeting this week on monetary policy. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke will hold a news conference to talk about the economy and fed policy. you can see it live this afternoon starting at 2:30 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> we could take pictures of the brain with mri scans or ct scans and see the whole thing, but there's this enormous gap in between about how the circuits of the brain functions in order to be able to move my hand, or to look at you and process that information, or to lay down a member. we don't know how that works. with technologies yet to be invented, so a lot of this will be technology development and a lot of it will be nanotechnology. what we need to be do is to be able to record hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same time. and b
massacre of the same people by president assad. fortunately, the syrian nuclear capacity was destroyed. but unfortunately, thousands of chemical weapons remain. we cann we cannot allow those weapons to fall in the terrorists' hands. it could lead to an epic tragedy. in an attempt to spring to the arab world, it is an arab choice, it is an arab initiative. it may bring peace to the region, freedom to the people, economic growth to the arab states. eventually, it can lead to a better tomorrow. we pray it will become a reality. i believe the real division is between skeptics and those who believe in peace. your voice will encourage, i believe. you came to us with the clear message that no one should let skepticism win the day. a vision that says clearly that peace is not only a wish, but a possibility. i fully support your call. there is no other way to make the fooch better. there is no better leader to make it possible. your visit is an historic step in that direction. we shall journey with you all the way. thank you. >> thank you so much. well, thank you, president peres, for your very
civil war, to the north. the king was the first arab leader to call on bashar al- assad to go, and is cooperating with the u.s. and others to make that happen. jordan reportedly hosts u.s. and other special forces training the ragtag syrian rebels. but the pressures come from a flood of syrian refugees. some 460,000 now, housed in squalid refugee camps, and the numbers keep growing. >> how are you going to turn back women, children and the wounded? this is something that we just can't do. it's not the jordanian way. the problem is obviously the burden it's having on jordan. we've tried to quantify it as much as possible. the latest figure says it's going to cost roughly $550 million a year. not only is that a problem, but it's going to be a tremendous strain, obviously, on infrastructure, and it's creating social problems and security problems. >> warner: there are strains on jordan too from the fact an estimated half of all jordanians are palestinians from the west bank. so king abdullah has long urged the u.s. to get re-engaged in trying to bring peace between israelis and p
deny allowing the transfer of weapons through iraqi air space to president al assad's regime. >>> if you haven't heard the news yet, the winning powerball ticket for $338 million was sold in new jersey. sadly not here in atlanta. the winning numbers are 17, 29, 31, 52, 53. p powerball number is 31. the largest powerball jackpot in history was back in november. it was worth close to $588 million. >>> it is officially spring. may favorite season. birds, flowers, and great outdoors finally shakes off its winter coat. let me show you some glorious pring d spring days around the country just today. isn't that beautiful? kansas city, missouri. didn't get the memo that spring officially arrived four days ago. three to nine inches of snow. knocked out power to 5,000 homes today. atlanta, powerful thunderstorms. all night long. pushed over huge trees on to houses and cars. fell much colder than normal. water is rising all over the atlanta area. flood warnings in some places. and this is colorado. all around denver today. single digit temperatures and snow that shut down parts of both
perspective they believe assad has months, perhaps to survive in power and they're very worried in israel about what comes next because they have the experience of what happened recently in egypt. but it is iran the top focus especially for the israeli prime minister. president obama has said recently he wants to give more chance for diplomacy, he thinks there's several more months of an opening to try to have a diplomatic solution. the israeli president told me yesterday he's fully convinced no doubts president obama would use military force if necessary if dmoems failed and iran was at the point of having a nuclear warhead. the question on this trip is to see whether prime minister netanyahu who raised doubts about the president in the past shares president perez's conviction that there's no room, no space between israel and washington on that question. >> john, i think there's very little chance we'll see president obama and prime minister netanyahu playing basketball together or something. it's always been a traditionally frosty relationship. i suppose it's a lot of fence mending goin
as president assad becomes more vulnerable. >> i agree with that. i think there really is a danger that they could be used. and they pose a continuing threat. but making the red line chemical weapons entirely and just focusing on that i think sends a very bad message which is it is perfectly fine for him to butcher his people with anything other than chemical weapons, scud attacks, airplane attacks, etcetera. i think there needs to be a stronger line on other weapons as well. >> that is an interesting point. on twitter, i hate to invoke twitter but it is the seventh anniversary. so it is okay for assad to kill 70,000 men, women, and children but just don't use these weapons to do so. >> right. >> why is this a red line even existing? >> it's a red line because clearly of the humanitarian consequences and also because of israel as a neighbor and so forth. the possible fallout. i agree. i think the casualties are maybe approaching a hundred thousand, a million people made refugees, you know, it's clear i think that american leadership is needed in trying to bring this conflict to a c
constructive steps as it relates to what happens after assad leaves and we're certainly hoping for that day to be upon us. >> senator, bob casey, thank you so much. it's good to see you. >> thanks, chris. >>> we were watching -- it was a ceremonial tree planting ceremony. but in the meantime, ambassador, let me ask you a little bit more about syria. and we heard both president obama and netanyahu reference the changing region. let me ask you about your -- your thoughts on arming the rebels. should we or what might happen to get us to that point. what do you imagine these conversations over syria are going to be like? >> this creeping incrementalism that we have engaged in over syria is for all intents and purposes is not going to really change the equation on the ground. we have so marginalized ourselves with respect to the events on the ground in syria. the rule and reason that the united states could comply is more or less dissipated. most are furious at the united states for not doing enough, depending on which side you talk to and which group you can wind up talking to. and so this deba
at these reports. press press issued a warning to the assad regime. -- press secretary jay carney. >> i'm not going to discuss intelligence but important as fight in syria intensifies and fighting becomes more desperate that the united states and international community make it absolutely clear to assad that the use of chemical weapons would be totally unacceptable. the president was clear when he said if assad and those under his command use chemical weapons and fail to secure them there will be consequences and they will behold accountable. jenna: joining us is a research fellow at the new american foundation. he has traveled extensively in syria during this conflict many times and we called upon him for his expertise in this part of the world. brock, when you hear the reports come out what should we consider about them. >> first we need to know that the syria has the 30 or fourth largest stockpile of chemical weapons in the world. there are the a thousand tons of chemical agents in the past the obama administration will use the them as more and more of the country splits out of the regime contro
. >> the assad regime must understand they'll be held account yablt for the use of chemical weapons once establishing the facts i've made clear the use of the chemical weapon saz game changer. >> the president is holding talk was the nation prime minister, urging peace talks between israel and palestinians. >> we've just learned the names of all seven marines killed at the hawthorne army depot in nevada. the young men range from 19 to 26 years old. eight weathers were hurt in the explosion, investigators trying to figure out what caused the shell to explode. >> genetically modified fish getting a big no from two supermarket chains both trader joe's and whole foods say they will not sell the new type of geneticry engineered salmon. the fish is a cross between an atlantic and pacific salmon. kit grow twice as fast as regular salmon. fda says it won't hurt the environment but yikts say it could threaten other salmon if it gets into the wild. >> these two giants have been compared to fire and ice. a rivalry between apple and samsung over smart phones is fierce as you know. and now they're co
. >> reporter: it does not appear that the chemical in question was one of those most feared in president assad's arsenal. mustard gas or the deadly nerve agent, vx, and sarin. president obama said he was deeply skeptical that it was the rebels who carried out this attack. despite fears of chemical weapons being used in syria, the president said chemical weapons or not, the united states would not take military action in syria by itself. >> thank you, alex. >>> now we return back home to a new number confirming a worry in american families. tonight, one in 50 schoolchildren in america has a form of autism. the government survey is much higher than the previous estimate, 1 in 88. so what is happening? and also tonight, another small part of the puzzle. does it have anything to do with parents and grandfathers? abc's chief medical editor, dr. richard besser, on the clues. >> reporter: and now another clue into a possible cause of autism -- grandfather's age. researchers in sweden have found that the older a grandfather was when he had children, the more likely those children would be to have chil
supporter of syrian president al-assad and the most senior figure to die in syria's civil war. >>> a major shut down is confirmed for the third largest school district in the nation. ram he manu you' emanuel said th but necessary choice. opponents who turned out to protest yesterday said the closures will only endanger students in troubled areas who may have to cross gang boundaries to attend classes. the consolidation will save $560 million over ten years. >>> gun legislation set to hit the senate floor next month will include universal background checks. this according to harry reid who introduced the bill on the senate floor last night. the top senate democrat is vowing that any bill that passes the senate must include background checks, the most contentious portion of the measure. reid also promised votes on proposed assault weapons ban. the legislation also aims to make gun trafficking a federal crime and strengthen safety measures at schools. >>> and just yesterday, the late beetle john lennon was thrust into the gun debate when his widow drew attention to the cause tweeting a photo
about syria's future once president assad leaves office. >> i'm very concerned becoming an enclave for extremists because they thrive in chaos. >> dan: during his visit to israel he helped broker a phone call between benjamin netanyahu and his turkish counterpart to restore diplomatic relations. netanyahu apologized for the deaths of nine turkish activists and naval raid on gaza bound flotilla. he helped arrange that call before leaving israel. palestinians are clearly frustrated. they say president obama's message of hope is empty, just words. the story now from our reporter. >> president obama's last trip took him to bethlehem. highlight of this trip that has strengthened bonds with israelis but frustrated palestinians. they vented their anger with protests fueled in part by obama not condemning israeli settlements to build houses on land long held by palestinians. for families like these. today their house is an island. this is how over the past 30 years a nearby israeli settlement has grown, swallowing up almost half their land. rest cut off my a security fence. it's like we're
his own people than relinquish power. assad must go so the serious future can begin. because true stability in syria begins upon establishing a government that is responsible to its people. one that protects all communities within its borders while making peace with countries beyond them. these are the things i think about when i think about israel's security. when i consider israel's security i also think about a people who have a living memory of the holocaust. faced with the prospect of a nuclear-armed iranian government that has called for israel's destruction. it's no wonder israelis view this as an existential threat. but this is not simply a challenge for israel. it is a danger for the entire world including the united tates. a nuclear-armed iran would raise the risk of nuclear terrorism, it would undermine the nonproliferation regime, it would spark an arms race in ra volatile region, and it would embolden a government that has shown no respects for the rights of its own people or the responsibilities of nations. that's why america's built a coalition to increase the cost
to i think the prime minister for that answer. everyone is appalled by the actions of the assad regime. but he will know that there is not only a lack of unity among syrian opposition groups, but there's also the known presence of al qaeda backed organization on the ground in c. does the prime minister understand the widespread concern that remains about the idea of seeking supplies and weapons to rebels? >> i think the leader of the opposite puts the point right. there is widespread concern about the nature of the opposition and the argument i think we have to engage in is this. are we more likely to help the good elements of the opposition by standing back, or are we more likely to help by getting into and shaping and helping and giving this technical assistance so we can play a part in building up the syrian opposition so they are legitimate and credible alternatives to this hateful regime? it is worth recalling and we should all recall the fact that current policies are not working for the people of syria. 70,000 people are dead, and this hateful regime is still in place. >> he's r
, helping to sustain president assad and his regime. >> the unite is asking iraq to force the planes to land in iraq for inspections but so far only a few planes have been checked. the united nations estimate 70,000 people have been killed since the uprising began in syria two years ago. >>> in other news of the world tonight, ciphers reached an 11 hour sale. the agreement is designed to -- the move was necessary to allow cypress to qualify for $13 billion in international aid. >>> in mali this weekend, rebels attacked the town of gauge. children dodged bullets to bring supplies to french forces fighting the rebels. this was the third major offensive by islamics since the town was retaken by a french led military operation in late january at least four rebels were killed. >>> and in paris, hundreds of thousands demonstrated against a bill that would allow same- sex couples to marry and adopt children. the bill has already passed in france's lower house of parliament. >>> a young southern california girl survived an early morning car crash and hiked about a mile to try to get help for her fa
to the geneva commune kay for those of us engaged in that effort anything that supports president assad is problematic. >> problematic indeed. iraq however along with iran defends the oversight. malki basically says and senior officials say that the flights are for humanitary concerns. secretary kerry says the over flights are something that are threatening the relations between u.s. and fragility. secretary kerry goes on to say that for iraq to move forward it must have fair leblgss. he says quote there's an enormous investment of our treasure our people and our money into this initiative. the world has an interest in seeing iraq take the leading role as a functioning democracy. due though that elections will be critical. if iraq remains conclusive and cohesive it has a chance of succeeding. heather? >> kelly wright thank you so much. >> the time now 11 after the top of the hour. after a week cbs finally addresses the controversy over this memorial being used as a prop during the show "the amazing race." was it enough? >> we report you decide. >> why people are flocking to this particu
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